Comments from Gerald A. DeLuca

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Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Loew's State Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 7:38 am

Loew’s State did not normally play foreign-language films, but they did run the Italian TOMORROW IS TOO LATE in 1952 in a subtitled print to enormous business (Variety: ‘Tomorrow’ Smash 45G). It was a lovely but now forgotten movie featuring Pier Angeli and Vittorio De Sica and dealt with the sexual awakening of adolescents. The movie went on to play art houses around the country, and in a dubbed version was even shown at drive-ins.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Pix Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 7:28 am

But they had had a long non-porn history that went way back. I have a 1948 ad here for the French film CONFESSIONS OF A ROGUE with Louis Jouvet. The Pix also day/dated with the Beekman for part of the opening run of Visconti’s great ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS in 1961.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Cinemart Cinemas on Mar 19, 2004 at 6:34 am

In the 1950s for a time it ran silent films as the Inwood Art Theatre. I have an ad clipping of a run of Chaplin’s THE GOLD RUSH which had a very long play in 1959. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA and CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI, with live piano accompaniment, were listed as the upcoming program.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Park Avenue Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 6:30 am

HAMLET ran on a reserved-seat, two showings per day policy, under the aegis of the Theatre Guild.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Carlton Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 6:25 am

In 1952 the Carlton showed one of my favorite Italian films from that period: TOMORROW IS TOO LATE, with Pier Angeli and Vittorio De Sica. It dealt with the sexual awakening of adolescents and was very well done. In New York it had opened to great success in the Loew’s State in Times Square, unusual for a foreign film. I actually first saw it later at Providence’s Avon. That film even went on to play at drive-ins…like the Pike Drive-In on Hartford Avenue in Johnston, RI.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Loews State 4 on Mar 19, 2004 at 6:16 am

So is there a posting for the Loew’s State Theatre which existed in the 50’s and 60’s in Times Square??? Not clear here.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about UA Forest Hills Twin Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 5:25 am

Does anyone who is familiar with theatres in Queens have information on a place that in the 1950s was called the “Inwood Art Theatre” that ran silent films? I have an ad clipping of a run of Chaplin’s THE GOLD RUSH which had a very long play in 1959. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA and CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI, with live piano accompaniment, were listed as the upcoming program. The address was 106-03 Metropolitan Ave., Forest Hills, Queens.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Loews Festival Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 3:42 am

In late 1991 the proprietors of the Brattle Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts were close to finalizing a deal that would have allowed them to program the Festival Theatre on 57th Street as a repertory house. This plan, though reported in a Boston Globe article as imminent, would fall through.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Little Carnegie Theatre on Mar 19, 2004 at 3:10 am

No, Savage, the Biograph was further west from the Little Carnegie, on 57th near Broadway and right near Hard Rock Cafe'. I believe it started out as the Lincoln Art in the 1960s, and I remember seeing a good number of movies there in my visits to New York, including Fellini’s THE CLOWNS. For a long stretch it was the Bombay Cinema, showing films from India. The Little Carnegie was a block east, a couple of doors down from Carnegie Hall.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Fine Arts Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 3:07 pm

Their programming was even better than the Brattle in Cambridge at the time (1960s) because you generally got double bills for one low admission, whereas the Brattle then showed only a single film at 7:30 and 9:30. This is where I first saw Visconti’s WHITE NIGHTS, with Marcello Mastroianni and Maria Schell, which was hardly shown anywhere else. I brought two friends to see UMBERTO D and THE BICYCLE THIEF on a double bill. They kept running to the concession stand to buy snacks and soften the neo-realist misery. They showed lots of French new wave and classics like GRAND ILLUSION with RULES OF THE GAME, Ingmar Bergman films, Bogart and Cagney series. Truly a great place.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Cinema 3 on Mar 18, 2004 at 11:04 am

I saw several films here during the theatre’s modest life. THE CONSEQUENCE by Wolfgang Peterson was one. Pier Paolo Pasolini’s astonishing ARABIAN NIGHTS was another.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Fine Arts Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 8:56 am

Richard, I believe you are right. I remember walking in once and mourning the loss of the theatre. Nothing against churches, but why aren’t more churches converted into theatres rather than the other way around?

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Theatre 1 & Space 57 on Mar 18, 2004 at 8:51 am

The street number is probably correct, but it is a far stretch to refer to it as Chinatown, which is a good number of blocks away. Nothing Chinese is there. The theatre is close to Park Square.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Cinema 1, 2 & 3 by Angelika on Mar 18, 2004 at 8:42 am

The “Cinema 3” at the Plaza Hotel was actually referred to as Cinema III, in a review I have from the New York Times. Since it was a separate theatre in another part of town, it deserves its own listing, which I shall submit.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Loew's State Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 8:15 am

Then perhaps I shall be bold enough to add a separate listing for the Fine Arts Theatre to see what memories some folks may have of that place.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Garden City Cinema on Mar 18, 2004 at 8:02 am

When E.T. played here, day/dating in its initial run with other area theatres, it was an enormous success, perhaps more than any other movie in the theatre’s not-very-long history. When the theatre was twinned by erecting a wall from rear to front, the two resulting spaces were long and narrow bowling-alley auditoriums, and CinemaScope films were no longer well-served as they had been in the single-screen years.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Little Carnegie Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 7:03 am

Yes, you may be right. I have in front of me the program notes the theatre gave out when I went there to see Antonioni’s ECLIPSE in December, 1962. It states simply “Little Carnegie” on the front, as do most of the ads I have. The now very amusing first paragraph of the notes begins, “Man’s inability to cummunicate and his sense of alienation continues to concern Antonioni…” That theme rather defined much art house fare of the period, and it was perfectly complemented by the then-free espresso so many of those places offered patrons to help them survive their angst.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Auburn Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 6:24 am

I will report some of the other contents of the 1915 ad I have here. For the week of April 19th, 1915, the theatre showed: Monday & Tuesday: THE MAN FROM HOME and JUSTIFIED; Wednesday and Thursday: THE STRAIGHT ROAD with Gladys Hanson and THE CHINATOWN MYSTERY; Friday and Saturday: THE BOUNDARY LINE and the Thomas Ince produced IN THE TENNESSEE HILLS. Admission was 10 cents for all shows.
(Sunday shows were prohibited in Rhode Island at that time.)

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Theatre 1 & Space 57 on Mar 18, 2004 at 6:13 am

I remember attending the Boston premiere of Alfred Hitchcock’s FRENZY here on June 20, 1972 with the great director in attendance. Hitch introduced the movie and cracked many sly jokes in his inimitable manner.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Little Carnegie Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 6:07 am

Sorry, the Carnegie Hall Cinema, with which the Little Carnegie is not to be confused, was around the corner on 7TH AVENUE.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Johnston Theatre on Mar 18, 2004 at 4:33 am

Nostalgic memories of the Johnston Theatre are many. As a child in the 1940s into the 1950s I remember regularly walking to the Sunday matinees at this theatre where the admission was 25 cents. The two-bits got you two movies, previews, cartoons, and for a while, a Roy Rogers Club featurette. 10 cents would get you a soda and a candy bar. Popcorn was no more than a dime. The kiddie-packed matinee, filled with screaming, unruly kids constantly running back and forth, particularly during quiet moments in any movie, made for an exceptionally raucous environment. All this was kept under reasonable control by an elderly matron who ran from row to row (she had a pronounced limp) and, with flashlight a-waving, snarled at kids in an attempt to keep them in line. She looked like the Wicked Witch of the West. Later, in our teen years, we would forego the Sunday matinees in favor of the Friday night shows,which is what all the local kids went to. We related to James Dean in REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE and EAST OF EDEN on a double bill at one of those shows. By common consent, the right rear of the theatre was reserved for smooching (and more) by amorous adolescents.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Loew's State Theatre on Mar 17, 2004 at 2:11 pm

I believe that the Fine Arts Theatre,which I mentioned above, was part of the Loew’s State building, and continued showing its art repertory until the mid 60s even after Loew’s itself stopped showing movies. You entered from the street on the right of Loew’s, went up a staircase, and came into this recital-hall sized theatre. Can anyone verify this? They had great programs. I went countless times in those years.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Symphony Cinema I & II on Mar 17, 2004 at 1:46 pm

…and SCORPIO RISING with JOHNNY MINOTAUR!

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Columbus Theatre on Mar 17, 2004 at 11:55 am

This theatre is actually a two-screen theatre. The balcony was scetioned off in the 60s and for a long while art house fare was programmed on both the downstairs screen and the upstairs one which was known as the “Studio Cinema.” The Studio screen was used, like the downstairs one, when the theatre was a porno house for over thirty years. Both screens are used during the annual Rhode Island Film Festival.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca commented about Symphony Cinema I & II on Mar 17, 2004 at 11:49 am

To show what the programming was like, some films I saw here were CUL-DE-SAC, DAISIES, 491, THE FIFTH HORSEMAN IS FEAR, I AM CURIOUS YELLOW, THE RAILROAD MAN, LA DOLCE VITA, DINNER AT EIGHT, THE COOL WORLD.