Comments from dsedman

Showing 51 - 63 of 63 comments

dsedman
dsedman commented about Clarinda Theatre on Feb 11, 2017 at 2:25 pm

Bluechel and Lannan purchased the Armory and Rialto in 1929 equipping the Armory with Vitaphone disc-based sound. After its theatrical life, it became known as the Glenn Miller Armory as Clarinda was his birthplace.

dsedman
dsedman commented about Ebony Drive-In on Feb 9, 2017 at 10:53 pm

Likely opened in 1952

dsedman
dsedman commented about Uptown Theatre on Jan 22, 2017 at 5:54 pm

The Orpheum Theatre opened on East Main Street in 1911 likely on a twenty-year lease. John Meehan bought the house running it from 1914 to its end of lease in 1931. Meehan had converted the theater to RCA sound on film technology in 1930. He sold it to new owners who relaunched on November 1, 1931 as the Uptown Theatre with “Big Boy” and “Rich People.” The Uptown closed on November 30, 1952 after a showing of “The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima.” It was converted to a piano store and demolished in 1992.

dsedman
dsedman commented about 10th Avenue Drive-In on Jan 18, 2017 at 1:47 pm

The 10th Ave. Drive-In is ready for its grand opening on September 30th, 1955

dsedman
dsedman commented about Lyric Theatre on Jan 17, 2017 at 3:11 pm

Received a new facade in 1937 for a more moderne look (see photo)

dsedman
dsedman commented about Kaw Theatre on Jan 11, 2017 at 6:32 pm

The Kaw Theatre had a film seized during its adult operation. On March 8, 1973, Judge A.B. Fletcher ruled that the Junction City theater’s presentation of the film, “Pornographic in New York” was obscene and ruled that the film had to be destroyed.

dsedman
dsedman commented about Globe Theatre on Jan 11, 2017 at 5:52 pm

The Globe Theatre opened on November 2, 1912 with the films, “The Refugee’s Casket,” “White Treachery,” and “All Account of a Handkerchief.” The architect of the theatre was Frederick L. Brown.

dsedman
dsedman commented about 10th Street Theatre on Jan 10, 2017 at 4:58 pm

The 10th Street Theatre opened in 1911 as a 480-seat venue at 15 Tenth Street in Kansas City. Located close to a major streetcar transfer point, the theater made heavy use of streetcar ads. It appears to have a brief name change under new ownership to the Columbia Theatre in 1918 but new operators gutted the theatre and with entrance moved returning to the Tenth Street Theatre moniker on September 25, 1920 at a grand reopening now with 650 seats. In 1928, the theatre went to a homemade disc sound system that had poor results before equipping to improved sound.

In 1937, the theatre under Ed F. Burgan went for a streamline modern makeover by architects Besecke & Swanson. The new theatre now had 877 seats.

dsedman
dsedman commented about Sun-Aire Drive-In on Jan 7, 2017 at 3:42 pm

The Sunair Drive-In Theatre opened October 3, 1950 and closed February 4, 1987 showing Hispanic films and a regularly-scheduled swap meet. It was demolished on March 3, 1987 to make way for an auto complex.

dsedman
dsedman commented about Enright Theatre on Jan 3, 2017 at 8:03 pm

The theatre was said to have been named after Thomas Francis Enright, the first Pennsylvanian serviceman and was among the first three serviceman killed during World War I. The large mural entitled, “America Triumphant” was above the lobby exit as created by S. Tilden Stern (shown in photos) commemorated Enright’s service.

dsedman
dsedman commented about Lyric Theatre on Jan 3, 2017 at 7:35 pm

Transformed to a streamlined, deco look in 1933 by architect Ben Schlanger (one interior picture in photos).

dsedman
dsedman commented about Liberty Theatre on Dec 25, 2016 at 1:15 pm

Ads for grand opening as the Savoy Theatreon May 30, 1912 in photos as the theatre competed against the Electric Theatre that had opened the previous year. The Savoy closed in 1920 but new operators relaunched as the Liberty Theatre with grand opening ad June 12, 1920 in photos. The last showing was on November 15, 1924 with new operators promising a Fall 1925 relaunch which never happened. It was converted to the Black Cat Indoor Miniature Golf Course.

dsedman
dsedman commented about Cinemore 6 on Aug 11, 2011 at 5:02 pm

The theater opened March 17th, 1969 with six films (Yours, Mine and Ours; Dracula Has Risen From the Grave; Paper Lion; The Night They Raided Minsky’s; The Boston Strangler; and Charro). It was marketed as the first six theatre complex in the Southwest and only the second in the U.S. closely followed by many more. It was one of those theaters the mall owner had hoped would last thirty years. And owner after owner — AMC, Trans Texas, Hollywood, and others kept that thing going somehow into its last days as a very lightly trafficked dollar house in 1997 or just two years before its 30th anniversary. The theatre became known as the Cinemore as the Northtown (enclosed) Mall was ending. Up to the end, it still had those iconic curtains opening before each show up. Its hey day was the 1970s when all of the major hits played there and people stopped going downtown to the palaces to see those same features. The space was converted away from theaters and to office space targeted at the then very fast growing telecommunications industry.